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Longevity of Body and Mind: Genetics and Beyond

  • The Living Room 357 West Jianguo West Road Shanghai China (map)

Genes are an important part of a long and healthy life. Another critical part is environment, like diet and lifestyle, which can alter the actions of genes. You can't yet change your genes, but you can regulate their activities to maximize quality and length of life of both body and mind. Different genes require different environmental controls for optimal outcomes. Understanding these genetic differences can help us to make informed choices.

In this talk, Dr. Preston Estep, a leading researcher of genetics and aging, will share how genetic and related knowledge can empower you to make informed decisions affecting both quality of life and longevity. We will cover topics of genetics, epigenetics (bridge between genes and environment), the microbiome (the microbes that live in and on us), and more. We will focus on their roles in human health and disease—especially the health and longevity of our minds.
 

EVENT DETAILS

Date
21 July 2015  |  19.00 - 21.00 
Registration starts from 18:30

Venue
The Living Room
357 West Jianguo West Road

RSVP
Space is limited. 
Email [email protected] with name and mobile number

Cost
RMB 200 at door (Includes canapés and networking)

Talk in English with Chinese translation

 

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Dr. Preston Estep received his Ph.D. in Genetics from Harvard and his B.S. from Cornell. He performed his doctoral research in The Harvard Molecular Technology Group laboratory of genomics pioneer Professor George Church. Dr. Estep is an entrepreuner, inventor and researcher. He is currently Chief Scientific Officer of Veritas Genetics, a Director for the Harvard Personal Genome Project and also advisor to many pioneering biotech companies. Originally trained as a neuroscientist before moving to genome science, Dr. Estep's research interests include cognition, aging and senescence, and the preservation of later-life cognitive function and prevention of dementia